20 August 2013

Was Ishmael (pb&jbuh) gay?

Sarah (she was called “Sarai” back then) was the first of a long line of barren women who were desperate for children. (In the Bible, it is the women who are barren, never the men.) So she sent Abraham (“Abram”) “in unto” her slave, Hagar, so that she can "obtain children by her." Abraham does as he’s told and impregnates Hagar.
Now Sarai Abram's wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar. And Sarai said unto Abram, Behold now, the LORD hath restrained me from bearing: I pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her. And Abram hearkened to the voice of Sarai. Sarai ... took Hagar her maid the Egyptian ... and gave her to her husband Abram to be his wife. And he went in unto Hagar, and she conceived. Genesis 16:1-4
Soon Sarah became jealous of Hagar and treated her so badly that Hagar ran away. Then an angel appeared and told Hagar to return to her mistress. So she did, and amid this messed up family life situation Ishmael was born.
When Sarai dealt hardly with her, she fled from her face. And the angel of the LORD found her ... And he said ... Return to thy mistress, and submit thyself under her hands ... Behold, thou art with child and shalt bear a son, and shalt call his name Ishmael. 16:6-11
Fourteen years later, God helped Sarah get pregnant, and Isaac was born. (I’ll skip Bible quotes here.) Then after Isaac was weaned, Sarah saw the 16-year-old Ishmael “mocking” his two-year-old brother.
The child [Isaac] grew, and was weaned ... And Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, which she had born unto Abraham, mocking. 21:8-9
Some have suggested that Ishmael’s “mocking” of his younger brother Isaac was of a sexual nature, noting that the same word (metzahek) is used to describe the behaviour in this verse is used in Genesis 26:8 to describe Isaac's fondling of Rebekah.
Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out at a window, and saw, and, behold, Isaac was sporting [metzahek] with Rebekah his wife. 26:8
If so, that might explain Sarah’s hostility toward Ishmael, since in the very next verse she tells Abraham to abandon Ishmael and his mother Hagar. (Although Sarah was hostile to Ishmael while he was still in Hagar’s womb.)
Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son. 21:10
God, by the way, agreed with Sarah, telling Abraham to do what she said.
And God said unto Abraham ... hearken unto her voice. 21:12
Maybe God saw what Sarah saw.

4 comments:

bob said...

"The child [Isaac] grew, and was weaned ... And Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, which she had born unto Abraham, mocking. 21:8-9"

7048. qallâçâh kal-law-saw' Definition: ridicule. KJV Translation(s): mocking.

1701. ἐμπαιγμός empaigmós emp-aheeg-mos' Definition: derision. KJV Translation(s): mocking.

1702. ἐμπαίζω empaízō emp-aheed'-zo Definition: to jeer at, i.e. deride. KJV Translation(s): mock.

“Some have suggested that Ishmael’s “mocking” of his younger brother Isaac was of a sexual nature, noting that the same word (metzahek) is used to describe the behaviour in this verse is used in Genesis 26:8 to describe Isaac's fondling of Rebekah.”

Who is this “some” that have “suggested” and where can we find “metzahek”?

“Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out at a window, and saw, and, behold, Isaac was sporting [metzahek] with Rebekah his wife. 26:8”

6711. tsâchaq tsaw-khak' Definition: to laugh outright (in merriment or scorn); by implication, to sport. KJV Translation(s): laugh, mock, play, make sport.

7832. sâchaq saw-khak' Definition: to laugh (in pleasure or detraction); by implication, to play. KJV Translation(s): deride, have in derision, laugh, make merry, mock(-er), play, rejoice, (laugh to) scorn, be in (make) sport.

Strong's Dictionary of the Bible
(2011-08-26).

Steve Wells said...

Here are a few sources that suggest that Ishmael was sexually molesting his younger half-brother Isaac.

Gerald Larue, Sex and the Bible, 99
Jonathan Kirsch, The Harlot by the Side of the Road, 48-51
David J. Zucker, What Sarah Saw: Envisioning Genesis 21:9-10

See the article by Zucker for "metzahek".

bob said...

“Here are a few sources that suggest that Ishmael was sexually molesting his younger half-brother Isaac.”

It may also be worth considering the following.

“9. Ishmael's "'playing' with Isaac need mean no more than the older boy was trying to amuse his
little brother. There is nothing in the text to suggest he was abusing him." Speiser, p. 155. In
Genesis 19:14 the same verb "metzahek" has the sense of "jesting" or "kidding" someone. It is a very flexible verb.” (from the article: What Sarah Saw, by D. Zucker)

In other words, the true meaning of this verb is dependent on the commentary of the surrounding scripture.

There was already tension between Sarah and Hagar (Genesis 16:4-6), so when Sarah saw Hagar’s son scoffing (NKJV), laughing (ESV) making fun of (NLT) making sport (Torah, Tanakh), mocking (KJV, Amplified, NIV, NASB) Isaac, it was the last straw and she reacted angrily with, “Cast out this bondwoman and her son.” She was at the same time also aware that God would establish his covenant with Isaac rather than Ishmael (Genesis 17:21). Hence, “For the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, namely Isaac.”

“Some Bible critics have been bold enough to suggest that the biblical text is intended to reveal that Ishmael is engaged in some kind of sex-play with young Isaac, but the pious editors of the Masoretic Text sought to play down the disturbing sexuality of the scene by leaving out the key phrase “with her son Isaac.” The Septuagint and the Vulgate, it is suggested, preserve the original, complete and unexpurgated text—and these translations preserve, too, a hint of what Sarah sees.”

(Kirsch, Jonathan (2010-11-30). The Harlot By The Side Of The Road: Forbidden Tales of the Bible, p. 50)

Here Bible critics are “Suggesting” or ascribing meaning to the text without actual real textual proof of the incident happening. In other words, just an unsubstantiated “suggested” hypothesis/opinion.

continued...

bob said...

MOCK, MOCKER, MOCKING

A. Verbs.

1. empaizo (1702), a compound of paizo, “to play like a child” (pais), “to sport, jest,” prefixed by en, “in” or “at,” is used only in the Synoptists, and, in every instance, of the “mockery” of Christ, except in Matt. 2:16 (there in the sense of deluding, or deceiving, of Herod by the wise men) and in Luke 14:29, of ridicule cast upon the one who after laying a foundation of a tower is unable to finish it. The word is used (a) prophetically by the Lord, of His impending sufferings, Matt. 20:19; Mark 10:34; Luke 18:32; (b) of the actual insults inflicted upon Him by the men who had taken Him from Gethsemane, Luke 22:63; by Herod and his soldiers, Luke 23:11; by the soldiers of the governor, Matt. 27:29, 31; Mark 15:20; Luke 23:36; by the chief priests, Matt. 27:41; Mark 15:31.¶

2. mukterizo (3456), from mukter, “the nose,” hence, “to turn up the nose at, sneer at, treat with contempt,” is used in the passive voice in Gal. 6:7, where the statement “God is not mocked” does not mean that men do not mock Him (see Prov. 1:30, where the Sept. has the same verb); the apostle vividly contrasts the essential difference between God and man. It is impossible to impose upon Him who discerns the thoughts and intents of the heart.¶

Note: Ekmukterizo, a strengthened form of the above, “to scoff at,” is used in Luke 16:14 and 23:35 (RV, “scoffed at”; KJV, “derided”). See Deride, Scoff.¶

3. chleuazo (5512), “to jest, mock, jeer at” (from chleue, “a jest”), is said of the ridicule of some of the Athenian philosophers at the apostle’s testimony concerning the resurrection of the dead, Acts 17:32.¶

4. diachleuazo, an intensive form of No. 3, “to scoff at,” whether by gesture or word, is said of those who jeered at the testimony given on the Day of Pentecost, Acts 2:13 (some mss. have No. 3).¶

B. Nouns.

1. empaiktes (1703), “a mocker” (akin to A, No. 1), is used in 2 Pet. 3:3, RV, “mockers”. (KJV, “scoffers”); Jude 18, RV and KJV, “mockers.”¶ In the Sept., Isa. 3:4.¶

2. empaigmos (1701), the act of the empaiktes, “a mocking,” is used in Heb. 11:36, “mockings.”¶ In the Sept., Ps. 38:7; Ezek. 22:4.¶

3. empaigmone (1702d), an abstract noun, “mockery,” is used in 2 Pet. 3:3 (some mss. omit it, as in KJV): (see also No. 1, above).¶

Vine's Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words: (1996-08-28).